Multi-stakeholder Forum: Members

Thank you for your interest in the Multi-stakeholder Forum selection process. In response to the call for nominations for stakeholder members, the selection committee received 21 nominations representing a highly competitive and accomplished list of stakeholder leaders representing different regions and thematic interests. We are now delighted to share the eight stakeholder members.

Name Region Organization Nomination Other material
Cara Zwibel ON Canadian Civil Liberties Association Documents Other
Claire Woodside ON Publish What You Pay-Canada Documents Other
Jean-Noé Landry QC Open North Documents Other
Lindsey Marchessault MB Open Contracting Partnership Documents Other
Michael Lenczner QC Powered by Data Documents Other
Pamela Robinson ON Ryerson University Documents Other
Rob Davidson ON Open Data Institute - Ottawa Documents Other
Tracey Lauriault ON Carleton University Documents Other

Rob Davidson was subsequently selected by stakeholder members to be the Stakeholder Chair.

The stakeholder members will join the government members to form the Multi-stakeholder Forum:

  • Mélanie Robert, Executive Director of Open Government and Service, Treasury Board Secretariat
  • Jaimie Boyd, Director of Open Government, Treasury Board Secretariat
  • Laura Wesley, Executive Director of Consultations and Citizen Engagement, Privy Council Office
  • Sandy Kyriakatos, Chief Data Officer, Employment and Social Development Canada

The selection committee’s public account of its process, deliberation and choice follows.

Selection committee process

The members of the selection committee were selected by the Forum Chairs.

The Forum Chairs were:

  • Mary Francoli (Stakeholder Chair, Carleton University)
  • Jordan Zed (Government Chair, Treasury Board Secretariat)

The members of the selection committee were:

  • Andy Kaplan-Myrth (TekSavvy)
  • Bianca Wylie (Open Data Institute - Toronto)
  • Diane Mercier (Ville de Montréal)
  • James McKinney (Open Contracting Partnership)

Short list process

Each selection committee member scored stakeholder nominees based on the documents they provided: a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and one strong example of an article, blog post, piece of writing or video by the candidate that reflects the candidate’s thinking and articulation on open government and civil society issues.

The selection committee condensed the criteria in the call for nominations into three scores:

Ability to read and represent the interests of civil society

  • 1 point if the candidate is hardly rooted in or connected with civil society in Canada
  • 3 points if the candidate has broader and more in-depth experience across civil society in Canada (e.g. knowledge of and networks on more issues)
  • 5 points if the candidate is very well connected across civil society in Canada, beyond one issue and region

Working across stakeholders

  • 1 point if the candidate has limited experience engaging with federal government officials in Canada
  • 3 points if the candidate has regular experience engaging with federal government officials in Canada
  • 5 points if the candidate, furthermore, has led civil society coalitions or is experienced in multi-stakeholder initiatives or negotiating across stakeholders

Leadership

  • 1 point if the candidate has a limited track record of championing and articulating open government issues, ideas and values
  • 3 points if the candidate has a good track record of championing and articulating open government issues, ideas and values
  • 5 points if the candidate is frequently cited, interviewed, published or invited to speak  on issues relating to open government

Committee members recused themselves from scoring and interviewing any nominees if necessary: for example, if they were work colleagues or were a nominee’s reference.

The scores were averaged, and the top 16 short-listed candidates proceeded to interview for the eight stakeholder seats.

The minimum and maximum possible shortlist scores were 3 and 15. Short-listed candidates scored between 8.5 and 15, and unsuccessful candidates between 3.5 and 8.

Interview process

Two committee members phone interviewed each candidate. The pairings were selected at random, taking availabilities and recusals into account. Candidates had one hour to answer five standardized questions, inspired by the criteria in the call for nominations. The committee members awarded 1, 3 or 5 points per question, according to a standardized scoring system.

The minimum and maximum possible interview scores were 5 and 25. Successful candidates scored between 21 and 25, and unsuccessful candidates between 14 and 23.

A total score was then calculated for candidates, which weighted and combined candidates’ shortlist and interview scores.

The minimum and maximum possible total scores were 9 and 45. Successful candidates scored between 36.2 and 44.5, and unsuccessful candidates between 25.3 and 37.7.

Per the call for nominations, “at least six stakeholder members must be representatives of not-for-profit organizations registered in Canada.” To get six representatives of not-for-profit organizations, the selection committee had to take the ten top candidates and remove the bottom two non-representatives of not-for-profit organizations.

The selection committee then evaluated the diversity of this group, across a range of factors (e.g. gender, geography, experience, issue, skills), but made no changes.